electrics central

A forum for discussing boat or trailer repairs or modifications that you have made or are considering.

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Richard O'Brien
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electrics central

Post by Richard O'Brien » Wed Mar 08, 2006 10:35 am

I have one more item on my winter Mods list, and that's creating a place for all this electronic stuff. Every time I add a depthfinder, bilge pump, LP gas detector, etc., it comes with a small box to be mounted somewhere and wired. I'm thinking that I need a place for all these gizmo's. On the plus side I found a 1/2" piece of white expanded polystyrene?, or urethane? can't remember. In any case it's light, strong, drills and cuts like wood, and waterproof.

What, and where have you guys done about this. I'm afraid to drill into those longitudinal stringers running down the bilge? Does glueing stuff with 5500 work? Any ideas?

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Chip Hindes
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Post by Chip Hindes » Wed Mar 08, 2006 11:08 am

What, and where have you guys done about this. I'm afraid to drill into those longitudinal stringers running down the bilge?
Be afraid. Be very afraid. Those "longitudinal stringers running down the bilge" are in fact the ballast tanks. I wouldn't drill into them for any reason, even if I intended to reseal them. It's just asking for trouble.

Though I've never tried it, 5200 should work as long as the surface you're fastening to is clean and dry. The neater and more permanent solution would be to fiberglass them in place. It's actually a lot easier than you might think. Get a free West Systems pamphlet from West Marine or visit the site on the 'net and see if it's something you'd be willing to try.

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Hamin' X
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Post by Hamin' X » Wed Mar 08, 2006 11:34 am

Chip Hindes wrote:Be afraid. Be very afraid. Those "longitudinal stringers running down the bilge" are in fact the ballast tanks. I wouldn't drill into them for any reason, even if I intended to reseal them. It's just asking for trouble.
You beat me to it, Chip. Right on the money.
Chip Hindes wrote:The neater and more permanent solution would be to fiberglass them in place.
I'll have to agree and disagree on this one.
Although it is more permanent, that may be it's worst attribute. How many times have you gotten the "latest and greatest" and mounted it up, real nice, only to have a much better model come out next year. Or, you find out the the one you have does not perform as expected and you must upgrade, or change to another model, or brand. Of course, the new model doesn't fit the old bracket or holes.

I would think that a compromise is in order. Glass in a length of the poly board that he was referring to, or use some adhesive to hold it in place. This will allow you to swap out the old units for newer with out any trouble.

Just a thought.


Rich---Hamin' X---N7ZH

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Robert
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Longitudinal Stringers

Post by Robert » Wed Mar 08, 2006 12:24 pm

I agree with chip
Be afraid. Be very afraid. Those "longitudinal stringers running down the bilge" are in fact the ballast tanks. I wouldn't drill into them for any reason, even if I intended to reseal them. It's just asking for trouble.
..
But I would add to the ballast tank leak concern that I think the longitudinal stringers are structural to help the relatively wide flat hull be rigid as it can be, so I would be doubly afraid to cut on them in any way.

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Richard O'Brien
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Post by Richard O'Brien » Wed Mar 08, 2006 1:14 pm

Chip Hindes wrote: Those "longitudinal stringers running down the bilge" are in fact the ballast tanks.
:o My! that's enlightening. I wanted to add straps to secure my extra battery against heeling also, thus the desire to attach something firmly. I need to get things a few inches above the potential for bilge water also. Maybe I'll just epoxy some blocks down, and mount my buss panel to those.

How are the ballast "tunnels" formed. Are they pre-shaped in a U, or closed like a tube? If they are enclosed, how would you insure there are no cavities beneath? how could you control there placement in the mold? Do they register against the wet layers? Any body know?

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Chip Hindes
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Post by Chip Hindes » Wed Mar 08, 2006 1:28 pm

Don't know a lot about fiberglass layup, but my guess is they're molded separately as U-shaped channels and then glassed into place on the hull blank while it's still in the mold.

Robert's right (and for that matter, so were you) that they double as longitudinal stiffeners, but if that's all they were I wouldn't be concerned about putting a few screws in them.

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norbert
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Post by norbert » Thu Mar 09, 2006 9:41 am

drilling into the stringers is about the same as drilling thru the hull and bolt you battery to the floor! a secure way to flood your cabin (you have positive flotation though :wink: ). the only places you can drill thru are the bulkheads that are accessible from both sides (and be shure that there is no double wall!). i placed my house battery in the under-cooler-compartment under the aft dinette seat (in the central-aft corner there) and secured the battery box with a strap to the aft bulkhead (you look at the bolts when entering the cabin - clear :? ?). [this is for an :macx: ]

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dahicke
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What type of resin is used in a MacGregor 26X?

Post by dahicke » Sun Mar 19, 2006 7:06 pm

I just bought a used 26x and am considering some mods, though I would prefer not to drill holes. I have been considering adding fiber glass mounting tabs to structure and drill into those. I figure if change my mind latter I could saw them out.

The question is what kind of resin was orginally used? I read in the Summer issue of Boat Works there may bonding issues or required prep work for certain resins.

If no one knows, I'll ask the factory and post here.

Dave
:macx:

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Bobby T.-26X #4767
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Post by Bobby T.-26X #4767 » Sun Mar 19, 2006 8:30 pm

i've had alot of success using 5200 or epoxy to attach white "starboard" of faux starboard (plastic kitchen cutting board at Walmart) in places along the bilge that i am sure or unsure of.
that provides me with a safe area to screw into.
in all of my cases it has held fine.

Bob T.
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dahicke
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MacGregor 26X fiber glass resin

Post by dahicke » Mon Mar 20, 2006 2:48 pm

I called factory and asked about their type of resin used. They told me it was polyester resin and to bond to it they recommend using 80 sand paper to roughen the surface to get the shiney coating off, then use a polyester resin to bond to it.

I also found a link for suppliers on their website that list parts and drawing:
http://www.macgregor26.com/items_we_pur ... _list.html

The one for resin is:
http://www.macgregor26.com/items_we_pur ... ty_rr.html

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Richard O'Brien
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Re: MacGregor 26X fiber glass resin

Post by Richard O'Brien » Tue Mar 21, 2006 2:26 pm

dahicke wrote:I called factory and asked about their type of resin used. They told me it was polyester resin and to bond to it they recommend using 80 sand paper to roughen the surface to get the shiney coating off, then use a polyester resin to bond to it.l
Actually I work with resins pretty frequently, and I would not recommend patching with polyester. The odor of mekp catalyst lingers for months afterward, and except for cost savings there are no situations where a polyester bond is as good as an epoxy bond.

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kmclemore
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Re: MacGregor 26X fiber glass resin

Post by kmclemore » Tue Mar 21, 2006 4:11 pm

Richard O'Brien wrote:
dahicke wrote:I called factory and asked about their type of resin used. They told me it was polyester resin and to bond to it they recommend using 80 sand paper to roughen the surface to get the shiney coating off, then use a polyester resin to bond to it.l
Actually I work with resins pretty frequently, and I would not recommend patching with polyester. The odor of mekp catalyst lingers for months afterward, and except for cost savings there are no situations where a polyester bond is as good as an epoxy bond.
Agree.. I'd use Epoxy for add-ons. now, if I were creating a whole new product (like a table top) then, I'd use polyester.

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Night Sailor
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This worked for me

Post by Night Sailor » Tue Mar 21, 2006 4:18 pm

Ishaped a piece of fir 1x6 to fit the side of the hull for mounting a distribution panel, battery combiner, low voltage alarm, etc. in the battery compartment. After sealing and painting the wood I used lots and lots of Liquid Nails exterior construction adhesive to mount the panel to the hull without sanding the hull. It was completed with no odor in less than one hour and completely cured in 24.

I used the same technique to mount bases for the battery boxes of both banks of batteries to the hull. This has stayed firm now for five years. It was just an experiment to find readilly available alternatives to marine sealants and adhesives. It has worked so far in these no shear load positions. If I were mounting something heavy to a vertical surface I'd bolt it on or support it with a glassed in shelf, at least.

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